Millard Oaks Dental

Call: 402.891.9000

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6909 South 157th Street, Suite C
Omaha, NE 68136
Phone: 402.891.9000

Hours:

Monday: 7:30am - 5:00pm
Tuesday: 7:30am - 5:00pm
Wednesday: 7:30am - 5:00pm
Thursday: 7:30am - 5:00pm
Friday: 7:30am - 3:00pm

Internal and External Stains on Our Teeth

Many people are now faced with problems in their dental health. Particularly, teeth stains are an everyday occurrence that is faced by many at some point. While some of us don’t really care about oral hygiene, there are many who would pay a premium just to have impeccable dental health as well as appearance.

When we speak of dental hygiene, what comes to mind is generally about brushing one’s teeth to make them clean and white. Though it is true, cleaning one’s teeth does not only involve the external aspect of dental hygiene (i.e., the surface of the tooth). It also involves the internal aspect.

When we fail to maintain good dental hygiene, stains develop on our teeth. And it’s not just about esthetics, or appearance. The stains here concern both the external and internal aspects of dental health.

Internal stains on our teeth by definition, are not limited to the surface of our teeth. Rather, it is something that goes beyond it. To illustrate, tooth decays and cavities are internal stains. They cause damage to the tooth’s enamel, which in effect produces black spots on our teeth. Fluorosis is also an internal stain that is manifested by white stains on teeth as well as flaking. This tooth degeneration is caused when a person consumes large quantities of fluoride.

External stains, on the other hand, are relatively easier to treat compared to internal stains since the plaque layer attaches itself only on the outer part of the tooth. Stains caused by smoking or drinking coffee or tea are classified as external.

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